Fear of Happiness

Cherophobia can be defined as the fear of happiness, joy, bliss, or celebrating. Chero is a Greek word, which means to rejoice happiness or gaiety whereas Phobia in Greek means fear. Cherophobia or fear of happiness is the name given to a specific fear.

Cherophobia or fear of happiness generally emerges from a blend of external events especially traumatic incidents and internal predispositions which can be genetics or hereditary. Cherophobia or fear of happiness can be traced back to a particular triggering event; generally a traumatic incident happened at a very young age. Cherophobia or fear of happiness have more perplexing causes that are not entirely known right now. It is believed that genetics, hereditary qualities, and brain chemistry consolidate with life experiences to play a noteworthy part in the development of cherophobia or fear of happiness.

Ah, happiness, that elusive state. Philosophers, theologians, psychologists, even economists, have long sought to define it, and since the 1990s, a whole branch of psychology—positive psychology—has been dedicated to pinning it down and propagating it. More than simply positive mood, happiness is a state of well-being that encompasses living a good life—that is, with a sense of meaning and deep satisfaction.

Research shows that happiness is not the result of bouncing from one joy to the next; achieving happiness typically involves times of considerable discomfort.  Money is important to happiness, but only to a certain point. Money buys freedom from worry about the basics in life—housing, food, clothing. Genetic makeup, life circumstances, achievements, marital status, social relationships, even your neighbors—all influence how happy you are; or can be.

From Psychology Today

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